Canada’s Horseflesh Industry Scores Again: Neglected, Lame “Pet” Slaughtered for Meat

The CHDC has recently obtained documents through Access to Information, regarding Canadian Food Inspection Agency equine inspections performed from October 1 to October 31, 2018 at federally licensed slaughter establishments. Records received were from Bouvry Exports Calgary Ltd., Fort Macleod, Alberta and Viandes Richelieu Inc., Massueville, Quebec.

One trailer carrying 11 horses was refused at Bouvry Exports on October 12 due to incorrect EID identification.

On October 17, 2018 non-comformances regarding the transport of a severely lame horse (tag #468) were reported on the Humane Transportation of Animals form for one conveyance, described as a truck and 8’ by 30’ gooseneck trailer. This horse and 11 others had been loaded at approximately *4:30 a.m. on October 17 and transported to establishment #506 (Bouvry Exports, Fort Macleod, AB).

At approximately 7:45 a.m. a paint horse (#468) was observed to be noticeably limping during unloading and separated from the other horses. When questioned, the individual who had loaded them told a CFIA inspector that all were in good condition at that time, with no apparent lameness. It appears a veterinarian arrived shortly after being called at approximately 8:15 a.m. and found the horse in a separate pen, putting minimal weight on the affected leg. A swollen right hock joint was noted.

The trailer was examined for potential causes of injury such as gaps, holes, and sharp edges but none were found.

*The time of loading entered on the Humane Transportation of Animals form is 05:00 and time of unloading as 07:45.

From the Equine Information Document completed for this horse we learn she was a 7 year old skewbald mare, 14hh, with her Primary Use described as ‘Pet’. She was declared to be in the care of her previous owner from November 26, 2014 to October 9, 2018 and under the care and control of the transient agent from October 9 to October 17, 2018.

 

 

Upon post-mortem examination, this young mare was found to have a partial fracture of the tibiotarsal joint. Now identified as carcass # 424065, the affected portion of the leg was condemned and the remainder approved for human consumption.

If not lame upon loading as was claimed, we wonder how she sustained this painful injury and at what point on the 2 ½ hours long journey it occurred.

 

 

 

 

 

During this time period Corrective Action Requests (CARs) were issued where the operator did not meet the regulatory requirements related to ante-mortem document review, sanitary practices and operational sanitation.

7.4.2 Inspection Report – Corrective Action Request (IR-CAR)

An IR-CAR is issued to an operator/ licence holder by CFIA inspectors whenever a verification task is assigned an unacceptable level of compliance. The IR-CAR identifies the non-compliance and requires the operator/ licence holder to implement corrective measures by a specified date. The IR-CAR also describes the information gathered during the follow-up inspection conducted after the date for completion of corrective measures specified on the IR-CAR.

Source: CFIA Operational procedure: Meat Compliance Verification System (CVS)

Non-compliances identified at Bouvry Exports included incorrect Equine Information Document identification, cross-contamination of carcasses as they passed and came into contact with the evisceration stand, soiled clothing in contact with meat product and improperly worn beard nets.

Other problems were identified in the October 31 Verification Worksheet:

  • Cooler 5- floor littered with carcass labels, fat and meat scraps
  • Cooler 3- at transition from kill floor, plastic over railing had not replaced since October 12
  • Cooler 2- littered with broken pallets and waste material near loading dock

 

 

 

 

All documents may be viewed below and appear as received, with portions exempted under Sections 17, 19 (1), 20 (1)(c), 20 (1)(d) of the Access to Information Act.

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